Old Northside 19th Century courtesy of historicindianapolis

Old Northside 19th Century courtesy of historicindianapolis

Herron Morton today courtesy of Nathan Pfahler.

Herron Morton today courtesy of Nathan Pfahler.

The Old Northside and Herron Morton are two distinctly different neighborhoods with distinctly different pasts and futures. However, because they are adjacent to one another, it only seems fitting to tackle them both in the same post. 

The Old Northside is bordered by 16th Street to the north, 12th Street to the south, Pennsylvania to the west and Bellefontaine to the east (most consider College the border.) For the vast majority of it's long history, it has been a residential area, home to some of the city's finest Queen Anne and Victorian homes. The vast majority of the homes were built in the mid to late 19th century and were owned by the most prominent leaders in Indianapolis. It steadily rose in popularity up until World War I, at which point a 50 year decline left the area run-down and decrepit. In the mid-1970's, it was placed on the National Registry of Historic Places, and since that time has been renovated, refurbished, and remade to it's former glory. 

A drive through the current neighborhood is similar to hopping in to a time machine. Giant oaks and vibrantly painted shingles allow owners to feel that they are in the hub of turn of the 20th century Indianapolis. With a smattering of new construction seamlessly blended into street after street of carefully preserved original architecture, the Old Northside is home to natives, transplants, families, and professionals. A wide variety call this wonderful neighborhood home, as they add to it's storied history.

Just to the north, lies Herron Morton Place. This area has experienced a renaissance over the last few decades. Similar to the Old Northside, Herron Morton, a once vibrant residential district, experience a mass exodus after World War II. Residents pulled up stakes for the newly built subdivisions up north, leaving behind rental homes as well as abandoned properties. Seeing an opportunity to piggyback off of the resurgence of the surrounding area (prior to and in conjunction with the Fall Creek Place development), the existing homes were rehabbed and on the empty lots, new custom homes were built. 

This area is still primarily residential, but with nearby restaurants (Kountry Kitchen), bars (Shoefly), schools (The Oaks Academy and CFI 327), and parks, the area has become more attractive to the young families that abandoned it 40-50 years ago. Compared to the Old Northside homes are much more affordable. An updated 4 bedroom will sell right around $200k-$250k, with the higher end properties fetching close to $400k. 

If you are interested in learning more about either of these neighborhoods, please feel free to contact me.